LAKE HOMEROOMS / RATESXC SKI TRAILSWINTER CLASSESAHH-MENITIESENTICING EXTRA'SINN-FORMATIONGARDENS GALORESPECIALSREVIEWSTREEHOUSE SPAOUT AND ABOUTABOUT US

Innkeepers
Kathryn & Lyle Wallentine
Squaw Lake, MN. 56681
218-659-4797
stay@mylakeome.com
www.mylakeome.com

Snowmobiling Squaw Lake MN

 


The Avenue of Pines snowmobile Trail  are known for being some of the best groomed trails in the Chippewa Ntl Forest.  This trail connects to the Bushwacker trail that travels south to Deer River, Cohasset & Grand Rapids then continues east to the iron range trails.  The Avenue of Pines trail also connects to the Winnie trail, the Bowstring trail then up to the Blue Ox trail. From there the skies the limit.

White Oak's Sled Dog Classic----It is fantastic and fun for everyone! Check out www.whiteoakclassicsleddograce.org

 
 

C.C.C. Camp 707-F14 ... a memorial park was developed at Cut Foot Sioux the original site of the camp. Building foundation sites and points of interest throughout the campsite have been marked and described. Walking trails have been cleared and maintained throughout the camp complex. A parking area with a kiosk for directions and information is provided, so take a stroll down the walking trail paths at the C.C.C. camp 707- F14 memorial park located three miles down the highway at the junction of highway 46 and forestry road 2171.


       
The modern-day Cut Foot Sioux region was occupied by the Sioux but was always coveted by the Ojibwe for its rich resources. The tension between the tribes led up to a major battle in 1748. The Sioux defeated the Ojibwe and in commemoration of the victory, built the turtle mound. The turtle mound is today considered an “intaglio effigy.” An intaglio mound is one that is built into the ground rather than built on top of it. There are less than a dozen intaglios in the world ever recorded. The Sioux’s turtle mound had its head pointing north to signify that the enemy had been driven out in that direction.

Though the Ojibwe were defeated in the first battle, they returned to the area in the summer of 1748, with more drive to defeat their enemies. They surrounded the Sioux and killed the entire village. In celebration, the Ojibwe changed the direction of the turtle’s head so that it faced south. They also built a snake around the turtle to signify that the Sioux had been surrounded and annihilated. The head of the snake was pointed south like the turtle’s head, as a warning to other Sioux tribes.

The Turtle Oracle Mound today is seen as such a significant piece of history because of the fact that it is an intaglio. Archaeologists classify mound-related structures into four categories: linear, conical, effigy, and intaglio. A linear mound is a low, long mound of dirt that is usually straight. It is thought that linear mounds were used as defense. Conical mounds are heaps of dirt piled three to six feet high. Conical mounds are what most people think of when they hear the term “burial mound” (conical mounds were used for burial). Effigies are mounds that are in all different shapes and sizes and are usually animal shaped. Intaglios are essentially the opposite of mounds. They are not built on the ground, but rather dug into the ground. The Turtle Oracle Mound is considered a intaglio effigy because it is both dug into the ground and in the shape of an animal. As previously stated, there are only a small handful of intaglios in the world, and one of them is right here in Itasca County. Other intaglios can be found in California, Arizona, and Peru.

Another interesting piece of history came out of the battles at the Turtle Mound—Cut Foot Sioux Lake’s namesake. The story goes that the morning after the Ojibwe’s victorious attack, some Ojibwe found an unconscious Sioux warrior lying on the shore of the lake with an almost severed foot. From then on, the lake was referred to by the Ojibwe as “Lake of the cut foot Sioux.”

The Turtle Oracle was listed on the National Register of Historic Places because of its prehistoric and historic significance in 1974.  It is still seen as scared ground and its unique construction is such a rarity. How lucky we are to have such a historical treasure so close to home.

Cut Foot Sioux Ranger Station  is the oldest remaining ranger station building in the Forest Service’s Eastern
Region. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places,
located on State Highway 46 near Cutfoot Sioux Lake.  218-246-8233

Continental Divide
    The divide passes thru the hwy 46 area running west thru the 3rd river township of Dixon Lake and on to Blackduck.  Water shed flows north to Hudson Bay or south to the Gulf of Mexico.

Lodging in Blackduck MN

Lady Slipper Scenic Byway:  This Lady Slipper Scenic Byway in MN28-mile byway runs through the Chippewa National Forest.  Formerly known as "Scenic Highway, the byway was renamed in honor of the state flower.    This scenic highway extends from Cass lake  thru Pennington and onto Blackduck. Along your route you will come upon a slice of history at Camp Rabideau, one of three 1930's Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) camps in the country that are being preserved. Located on county 39 between state 2 and 71.  website...  www.fs.fed.us/r9/forests/chippewa/recreation/auto_touring/scenic_hwy.php  218-835-4291   . 


Area Golf Courses

Golf CourseTotal
Yards
Rating
Slope
Instruc.
Avail
Phone
Number
Directions
Location
Eagle Ridge Golf Club 6,245 69.4
121
Yes 218-245-2217 One Green Way
Hwy 169 East, Coleraine
Pokegama Golf Club 6,105 68.5
117
Yes 218-326-3444 3910 Golf Course Road
Grand Rapids
Sugarbrooke Golf Club 6,548 72.2
124
Yes 218-327-1462 Located at Ruttger's
Sugar Lake Lodge
Wendigo Golf Club 6,641 70.7
129
Yes 218-327-2211 750 Golf Crest Drive
Grand Rapids
Blueberry Hills Golf Course 3,121 34.6
110
Yes 218-246-8010 1 mi. N of Deer River on
Hwy. 6, turn E on G.C. Rd.
Golf on the Edge 2,963 66.8
104
Yes 218-743-3626 1.5 miles E of Bigfork
Cty Rd 261 & G.C. Rd
Blackduck Golf Club 3,029 68.7
123 
No 218-835-7757 

 
 
My Lake Home Inn and Tree House
AREA ACTIVITIES AND INTERESTING HISTORY IN THE SQUAW LAKE AREA
 
 
 

Lodging Close to Sand Lake in Itasca county MN


Chippewa National Forest
http://www.fs.usda.gov/chippewa

White Oak Casino
http://www.whiteoakcasino.com


Palace Casino

Northern Lights Casino
http://www.northernlightscasino.com/

MN fishing Pros Guide Service
http://www.mnfishingpros.com/

The Hill Bar & restaurant / 10 miles
http://www.thehillandmotel.com

FishTales  Dining / 11 miles

The Hoot & Holler Bar / 9 miles

Gosh Damn Bar & Restaurant / 18 miles
http://www.goshdamplace.com/

Hillcrest supper club / 22 miles

Timberwolf in Marcel 40 miles

Rileys / 25 miles

Judy Garland Museum
www.judygarlandmuseum.com

Forest History Center
http://www.mnhs.org/places/sites/fhc/rentals.html

Paul Bunyan Play House:  Contact   218-751-7270  

Paul Bunyan’s Animal Park: This family-owned animal park is the largest animal park in the state of Minnesota. Some of the highlights and features are animals such as lions, tigers and bears, (Oh my!) deer, a trout pond, and much more; a gift shop is also located on the site. Some of the larger animals are Camels and monkeys. Bring everyone out for an enjoyable day!  Located on the East side of Bemidji Minnesota just off Hwy 2. 218-759-1533  http://www.paulbunyansanimalland.com/



 Lost 40 northern Mn Inns & Lodging

 "Lost Forty"  Actually 144 acres, is one of the few places in Minnesota to experience truly virgin forest land that never has been logged. Less than 2 percent of Minnesota’s forests are considered old growth today.  These trees are up to 400 years old and between 22 and 48 inches in diameter.  A one-mile self-guided trail winds its way through the majestic pines of the Lost Forty.  Visit the Chippewa National Forest Hiking page for more information. or www.onlyinourstate.com/minnesota/lost-40-mn/


ATV Fun in Northern Minnesota  is popular in the Chippewa national Froest! If you have been looking for places to ride your ATV, this is the place for you.  This area host dozens of back roads trials for ATV enthusiasts. Get on Your ATV and just go right from here.
 

 

Bicycling in the Chippewa
 Mountain biking trails are just 3 mls from the inn 
Norway Beach paved trails 22 mls from Dixon Lake.
 

Paul Bunyan and Babe:  The home of Paul Bunyan and Babe are located on the shores of Bemidji Lake in Bemidji. These two statues are in the National  Register Of Historic Places. Paul stands 18' tall and Babes horns are 14' across. Visitors from all over the world stop here to get their photo taken with these two icons.

Horseback Riding / GERALD & DEBRA STEIN
14185 Teddy Rd. NE
Shevlin, MN 56676
Ph. 218-243-2629

Midway Bowling & Mini Golf located on Highway 169 North in Grand Rapids, Minnesota has bowling, a lounge, miniature golf course and batting cages.  Call 1-218-326-5950

Rasley's BlueBerry Bowl located just north of Deer River, Minnesota on Highway 6 has 10 bowling lanes, the Lucky Strike Lounge and a large dining room.   1-218-246-8048.

Blackduck Bowling Lanes located on Summit Avenue in Blackduck, MN is open to the public. 218-835-6620

Putt-N-Go Amusement Park
This family amusement park, open May through September, features go-carts, bumper boats, batting cages, waterslide, and a miniature golf course. Putt-N-Go is located in Bemidji Minnesota at 1915 Highway Avenue Northwest. 218-751-7333

Logging Days Held each year the first Saturday of every February, this event includes activities and events such as a lumberjack pancake feed, sleigh rides, old-time music, sawing contests, axe chopping and throwing contests, chain saw sculpting, woodcarving, crafts, and a Paul Bunyan Magic Show, as well as a variety of historic exhibits that are on display. /http://www.bvskiarea.com/loggingdays.html   Bemidji, MN / 218-243-2231 



 
 
 
 

 

Deer River Wild Rice Festival For more than 60 years the Deer River area has celebrated the World's Largest Wild Rice Festival. Originally, the festival was established to bring the community together to celebrate the abundance of one of the area's natural staples, wild rice. Though wild rice still grows abundantly in some of the area lakes and rivers, the advent of "paddy rice" which is grown commercially and harvested mechanically, has made the once regional product a national available commodity.Like the rice itself, the Wild Rice Festival has evolved as well. Today's wild rice festivals sponsored by the Deer River Lions Club feature a full schedule of activities designed to bring the whole Deer River Area Community together for a weekend of fun, food, entertainment, and fellowship. Whether you are young or old, there is always something to see and do at the festival.www.wildricefestival.com

Trout Lake Semiprimitive Non-motorized Area & the Joyce Estate offer 6,000 acres of forest with 26 miles of shoreline on 11 lakes. Ten miles of old roads and trails provide for hunting, hiking or skiing. The rolling terrain provides scenic views over area lakes wrapped with maple, aspen, birch and scattered pine.Visitors can tour the grounds of the Joyce Estate and view the rustic log architecture and stickwork characteristic of the Adirondack tradition. The Joyce Estate is located 13 miles north of Grand Rapids, one mile east of the intersection of County Road 60 and State Highway 38.

Blandin Paper Company Tours UPM-Kymmene purchased the Blandin Paper Mill in October of 1997, making it the first North American mill for UPM-Kymmene. Blandin was founded in 1901 in Grand Rapids, Minnesota and employs about 500 people. Making it one of northern Minnesota’s largest employers, with approximately 2,000 more jobs being indirectly attributable to the company’s local operations.

Suomi HillsThe remote setting of the Suomi Hills semiprimitive nonmotorized area is made up of rolling hills, clear lakes and some of the most spectacular fall color in the area. There are 21 miles of trail, numerous small lakes and several primitive campsites for day or overnight hiking, biking, skiing and canoe trips. The rolling topography offers cross country and mountain bike trails for intermediate and advance skiers and bikers. The trails are groomed and track-set in the winter and mowed in the summer.North Suomi Hills is the site of the Day Lake Civilian Conservation Camp (CCC), which became a prisoner of war camp during World War II.Suomi Hills is located 14 miles north of Grand Rapids on the Edge of the Wilderness Scenic Byway (State Highway 38).

Strawberry and Blueberry Picking June and July in northern Minnesota mean succulent strawberries and blueberries. Pick your own or buy them fresh-picked!

Blueberry Meadows - 34471 Eight Mile Road, Grand Rapids, MN, 55744. Phone: 218-326-0671. Directions: travel south of Grand Rapids on Highway 169 to Eight Mile Road. Pick-your-own blueberries beginning the last week in July.

Lavalier's Berry Patch - County Road 441, Grand Rapids, MN. Phone: 218-327-9199. Directions: travel Highway 2 East to SE 7th Avenue; turn right onto SE 7th Avenue, and then take a left onto River Road; follow River Road to County Road 441; turn left onto County Road 441. Pick-your-own and pre-picked strawberries usually available around July 1 and blueberries around Aug. 1. Call for current prices and to place orders for pre-picked berries.

Lunemann's Luney Berries Strawberry Farm - From Grand Rapids: 9 miles on County Road 63, left hand side of the road. From Deer River: East on Hwy. 2. Turn right on County Road 11 (Deer River Shortcut) to Hwy. 6. South on Hwy. 6 to County Road 63. Left on 63 for about mile and a half. Watch for Signs. No Appointment Necessary! Picking begins in July.

Edge of the Wilderness National Scenic Byway Take the afternoon to drive and enjoy the 47-mile Edge of the Wilderness Scenic Byway that meanders from Grand Rapids north to Effie on Minnesota’s State Highway 38. The region is studded with lakes and thick with aspen, birch, pine and maple trees that pop with color in the fall season. The road winds around 36 lakes, and through state and national forest. The Chippewa National Forest is home to the largest population of bald eagles in the continental United States. Keep your eyes on the sky to see them soaring above the byway.

Itasca Heritage Center Museum And Judy Garland Exhibit Explore the people, places and resources that make up Itasca County history. The Itasca Heritage Museum captures the flavor of the turn of the century and the stories of the people, places, and resources that shaped this region.  For more information call 218-326-6431 or visit their website at: www.itascahistorical.com.